Congressman Wants Investigation Into Whether Jared Kushner Gave Info To Saudis That Led To Khashoggi Murder

Jared Kushner, Donald Trump's son in law
Oliver Contreras-Pool / Getty Images

Jared Kushner has come under fire from a Democratic Congressman who has suggested that there may be a link between President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Texas representative Joaquin Castro told Newsweek that he thinks there should be an investigation into whether Kushner or “any other administration official” shared sensitive U.S. intelligence with the Saudis that could have led to Khashoggi’s killing or any other “political persecution.”

In his statement to Newsweek, he also cleared up his previous insinuation that Kushner may have delivered a “hit list” to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman with the murdered journalist’s name on it.

“To be clear, I did not intend to accuse Jared Kushner of orchestrating the killing of Jamal Khashoggi,” Castro said. “But based on several press reports, the close relationship between Kushner and Mohammad bin Salman is a source of concern for the U.S. intelligence community and those of us who want a transparent American foreign policy.”

Castro also mentions Kushner and Donald Trump’s business dealings with Saudi Arabia and said they are also a cause for concern.

“This is especially problematic given the President and his family’s business enterprises and the possibility that they profit from these foreign entities,” he added.

Newsweek reports that Jared Kushner and Mohammed bin Salman allegedly have a “friendly” relationship. There are reports that Kushner and the Saudi crown prince communicate via WhatsApp. He also had dinner with bin Salman when the prince was in Washington and again when Kushner traveled to Saudi Arabia.

NPR reports that a startup partly owned by Kushner sought a $100 million investment from a private fund linked to the Saudi government. The deal did not happen though, and the CEO of the company said that Kushner is not directly involved in the company’s operations.

Yesterday, Saudi authorities admitted that Jamal Khashoggi, a permanent U.S. resident and reporter with the Washington Post was dead. But they said that he died as a result of a “brawl” with Saudi officials at the consulate in Turkey.

But the BBC reports that unnamed Turkish officials have said that Khashoggi was dismembered at the consulate and that there is audio and visual proof of the murder.

Khashoggi was a critic of the Saudi regime and called for freedom of expression in the region, in his last column for the Washington Post

“The Arab world is facing its own version of an Iron Curtain, imposed not by external actors but through domestic forces vying for power,” he wrote.